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Majors

Sciences, Social Sciences or Humanities

Fields of study per major

The three majors (sciences, social sciences, humanities) are at the top of the chart in bold, followed by the various fields of study. 

Sciences

Social Sciences

Humanities

Maths Health Literature
Physics Anthropology Film
Earth & Environment  Sociology Philosophy
Chemistry Economics History
Biology Law Culture
Biomedical Political Science Art
Health International Relations Media
Information Environmental
Economics & Policy
 
  Cognition  

Majors

Listed below are the courses necessary to fulfil the requirements per major. Please keep in mind that students must also fulfil the necessary Academic Core requirements (see Academic Standards and Procedures) in addition to their electives in order to fulfil all the requirements for the degree. 

What is a "major course"? 

Each course is considered part of one o the majors (or majors if it's cross-listed) or Academic Core. The diagrams found via the drop-down menus below offer a visual categorisation of which course is considered part of each major. For example, the tan-coloured placemat for the Sciences lists all courses that are part of the Science major according to "track" (in the top row) and "level" (100, 200 or 300) in the side column.  Since Organic Chemistry, for example, is listed on the Science placemat, it is considered a course in the Science major.

View the requirements per major and "placemats" of the course listings
  • Sciences major course requirements
    1. 66 EC (equivalent to 11 courses) in the Sciences (indicated in the diagram below)
      • At least 24 EC (equivalent to 4 courses) of which are at the 300-level
      • At least one lab course in the Sciences
    2. The following methodology courses:
      • First year: Calculus 
      • By the end of the second year: Linear Algebra or Statistics for Sciences
    3. Capstone (Bachelor's thesis)
  • Social Sciences major course requirements
    1. 66 EC (equivalent to 11 courses) in the Social Sciences (indicated in the diagram below)
      • At least 24 EC (equivalent to 4 courses) of which are at the 300-level
    2. A choice of the following methodology courses:
      • First year: Methods for Social Sciences Research
      • By the end of the second year (choose one):
        • Statistical Methods for Social Sciences Research or
        • Qualitative Research Methods or
        • Mathematical Methods for Economics or
        • Statistics for Sciences
    3. Capstone (Bachelor's thesis)
  • Humanities major course requirements
    1. 66 EC (equivalent to 11 courses) in the Humanities (indicated in the diagram below)
      • At least 24 EC (equivalent to 4 courses) of which are at the 300-level
    2. The following methodology courses:
      • First year: Methods in the Humanities I*
        • ​​​​​​​*This course was formerly called "Introduction to Literary and Cultural Theory"
      • Second year: Introduction to Visual Methodologies
    3. Capstone (Bachelor's thesis)

Choosing major courses

With assistance from their tutor, students choose 66 EC (equivalent to 11 courses) in their major in subjects that interest them and suit their future ambitions. Tutors ensure that the chosen courses are coherent and will qualify for specific Master's programmes or careers. 

Some of the major courses are cross-listed with another major. This means that the course is interdisciplinary and that students learn about topics based on knowledge, perspectives, and/or methodologies from multiple disciplines. Other major courses will be part of AUC’s six course constellations. The course constellations help students explore interesting and sometimes unexpected connections between courses offered in their major and those from the two other majors.

Fields of study and specialisations

A student's package of major courses will include a certain specialisation in one or more fields of study. They will select specific fields of knowledge and further specialise their studies in those areas by taking a certain number of courses up to an advanced level. This brings coherence to the programme and ensures that all students achieve a sufficient depth of knowledge in a specific subject area in order to, for example, continue their studies at Master's level.